Students aboard Corwith Cramer prepare for month-long journey

The SEA Semester ship Corwith Cramer is in Woods Hole for the first time in a year before it leaves for Ireland.  Steve Haines/Cape Cod Times
The SEA Semester ship Corwith Cramer is in Woods Hole for the first time in a year before it leaves for Ireland. Steve Haines/Cape Cod Times

This village is no stranger to ships of all shapes and sizes on its waterfront. Barely anyone strolling down the street blinks an eye at ferry boats, deep-sea submersibles or Coast Guard cutters launching or landing from its docks.

But even for Woods Hole, the sight of a brigantine’s mast poking above the rooftops is far from an ordinary sight. Read more.

Advertisements

Children of Woods Hole scientists explore Cape Cod

When Natalie Boelman had the chance to spend a summer at the Marine Biological Laboratory working at the Ecosystems Center, it was a no-brainer. It meant discussing the ecological puzzles of the Alaskan tundra with mentors and collaborators just a few doors away instead of having them spread across the country.

That’s what got her to Woods Hole. What keeps the scientist coming back each year from her home base at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York City is swimming with her children in the ocean, walking them to their summer camp in the morning and back home at night and dining as a family at the picnic table just steps away from their back door. Read more.

MBL chief says new university affiliation will buoy finances, profile

WOODS HOLE — On the walls of Joan Ruderman’s corner office on the Marine Biological Laboratory campus are three reproductions of engravings done by German biologist Ernst Haeckel. Originally published near the turn of the 20th century, the panels were used in the days before PowerPoint to illustrate scientific concepts to students.

The vivid images display in intricate detail different parts of nature: hummingbirds in flight, Malaysian pitcher plants and orchids in bloom.

Ruderman had the panels hung after she became MBL’s 14th president and director in November. They harken back to her nearly four decades of work as a biologist. Now her focus has become the administrative side of science as she guides the independent nonprofit research institute through perhaps the most significant year in its history. Read more.